• Media

    Lippman on the Media

    "The quack, the charlatan, the jingo, and the terrorist, can flourish only where the audience is deprived of independent access to information."

  • Media,  Russia

    Russia’s War on Information

    The best counter to propaganda is truth and transparency, not more propaganda. Honest, unbiased facts coupled with unimpeded discussion by an informed citizenry is the most powerful weapon against the Kremlin’s disinformation that drains the future from Russia’s people and threatens Russia’s neighbors. ... This is not about Russia Today. This is about Russia’s tomorrow.

  • ICT,  Media,  Now Media,  Psychological Struggle,  Public Diplomacy

    North Koreans Quietly Open to International Broadcasts

    By Alan Heil (This post originally appeared at The Public Diplomacy Council.) For well more than a decade, Korea experts who specialize in international media have been examining the impact of foreign broadcasts and DVDs on users in North Korea. They have done so through a combination of in-country surveys and debriefings of defectors from North Korea, refugees and travelers abroad. In annual reports, Freedom House and Reporters Without Borders invariably have ranked that country as having the “least free” media in the world. Yet the curtain of near total silence appears to be opening as never before in North Korea.

  • Media,  Public Diplomacy,  Smith-Mundt,  Social Media

    Looking for a headline aggregator for Europe? The Rundown is one of the best

    Are you looking for a headline aggregator covering Europe, Russia, and South Central Asia?  The Rundown, compiled by Zach (@ZachPrague) at Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), is one of the best.  The mission of RFE/RL is to “promote democratic values and institutions by reporting the news in countries where a free press is banned by the government or not fully established.”  Naturally, the headlines Zach gathers focus on this mission.

  • Government Broadcasting,  Media

    Bye NPR. Hello BBC, Al Jazeera, Chinese Radio.

    The decision by Congress the House of Representatives to defund NPR and block local public radio stations from using federal money to acquire NPR content is, like any action, likely to have interesting unintended consequences. This action comes at a time when demand for information and knowledge of affairs around the globe continues to grow, to focus on just of the many values of NPR.  Congress The House is creating an opportunity that the US commercial media is unlikely to take advantage of, for whatever reason. The old giants of radio news, from CBS to NBC to the AP are unlikely to jump into the new gap and coverage of…

  • Government Broadcasting,  ICT,  Media,  Public Diplomacy

    Freedom to Connect

    By Jerry Edling “You will not be able to stay home, brother. You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out. You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and skip, Skip out for beer during commercials, Because the revolution will not be televised.” — Gil Scott-Heron, From the album “Small Talk at 125th and Lennox” (1970) “The revolution will not be televised…but it may be tweeted.” Posted on weeseeyou.com January 28, 2011 In some ways, Gil Scott-Heron’s song “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” was ahead of its time. The lyrics were recited rather than sung, accompanied by congas and a bongo drum,…

  • Media

    Three signs your newsroom is not ready to cross the digital divide

    The Knight Digital Media Center posted ‘three signs’ that indicate a newsroom remains focused on print, with online activities an ‘add-on’ operation. In today’s “now media” of converging platforms and audiences, the newsroom needs to think about where and when both the audience and the information are to be found. Alter the recommendations somewhat and the lessons apply to public diplomacy and public affairs offices as well. 1. The staff still reports to an assignment desk that is focused on print and/or is organized in departments that correspond to the sections of a newspaper. This inevitably means that newsgathering for print gets more time than the news organization can afford…