Diplomacy’s Public Dimension: Books, Articles, Websites #84

February 1, 2017

Intended for teachers of public diplomacy and related courses, here is an update on resources that may be of general interest.  Suggestions for future updates are welcome.

Bruce Gregory
Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication
George Washington University
BGregory@gwu.edu

Continue reading “Diplomacy’s Public Dimension: Books, Articles, Websites #84

Strategic Communication and Public Diplomacy “Quotables” and “Seen on the Web” (#51)

January 31, 2017
Quotable 538-540 & Seen on the Web 1092-1165, compiled by Donald Bishop, Bren Chair of Strategic Communications, Marine Corps University.

This newsletter provides a compilation of news, articles, essays, and reports of interest to practitioners and scholars of strategic communications, Public Diplomacy, public affairs, U.S. government international broadcasting, and information operations.  “Quotables” are gists of articles and reports available on the website of the Public Diplomacy Council.  “Seen on the Web” entries provide key quotes and links. They:

  • bring to busy overseas practitioners some of the academic and policy ferment in Public Diplomacy and related fields.
  • from long speeches, testimonies, and articles, flag the portions that bear on Public Diplomacy.
  • provide a window on armed forces thinking on the fields that neighbor Public Diplomacy–military public affairs, strategic communication, information operations, inform-influence-engage, and cultural learning, for instance.
  • introduce the long history of Public Diplomacy by citing some of the older books, articles, reports, and documents that are not available on the internet.  These are labeled “Classic Quotables.”

Download Don Bishop’s Quotables No 51.

Inaccuracies of Christian Science Monitor’s Moscow Correspondent

The American public has been losing confidence in the media for some time. A causal factor may be the now-decades-old reversion of the news as a profit center, and away from the “public good” that it had been for most of the 20th Century. Another factor surely is the democratization of information gathering as the former gatekeepers, whether a newspaper or wire service or TV network, were displaced by the “friends and family” plan of acquiring, sharing, and commenting on news events. Continue reading “Inaccuracies of Christian Science Monitor’s Moscow Correspondent

Strategic Communication and Public Diplomacy “Quotables” and “Seen on the Web” (#50)

January 24, 2017
Quotable 533-537, Seen on the Web 963-1091, compiled by Donald Bishop, Bren Chair of Strategic Communications, Marine Corps University.

This newsletter provides a compilation of news, articles, essays, and reports of interest to practitioners and scholars of strategic communications, Public Diplomacy, public affairs, U.S. government international broadcasting, and information operations.  “Quotables” are gists of articles and reports available on the website of the Public Diplomacy Council.  “Seen on the Web” entries provide key quotes and links. They:

  • bring to busy overseas practitioners some of the academic and policy ferment in Public Diplomacy and related fields.
  • from long speeches, testimonies, and articles, flag the portions that bear on Public Diplomacy.
  • provide a window on armed forces thinking on the fields that neighbor Public Diplomacy–military public affairs, strategic communication, information operations, inform-influence-engage, and cultural learning, for instance.
  • introduce the long history of Public Diplomacy by citing some of the older books, articles, reports, and documents that are not available on the internet.  These are labeled “Classic Quotables.”

Download Don Bishop’s Quotables No 50.

Strategic Communication and Public Diplomacy “Quotables” and “Seen on the Web” (#49)

Quotables, Seen on the Web, and Essays (#49) was compiled by Donald Bishop, Bren Chair of Strategic Communications, Marine Corps University.

January 9, 2017, Quotables 530-532, Seen on the Web 809-962

  1. THE JANUARY 6 INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY REPORT
  2. THE JANUARY 6 SENATE HEARING
  3. GRIZZLY STEPPE
  4. MORE ON THE U.S. ELECTION
  5. HYBRID WAR – INFORMATION WARFARE
  6. DISINFORMATION – FAKE NEWS
  7. RUSSIA
  8. UKRAINE
  9. CHINA
  10. TAIWAN
  11. NORTH KOREA
  12. ISLAMISM
  13. THE NEW ADMINISTRATION
  14. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY
  15. SOCIAL MEDIA
  16. EXCHANGES
  17. INFORMATION OPERATIONS
  18. TRANSLATION
  19. BROADCASTING
  20. IDEAS, CONCEPTS, DOCTRINE
  21. THE FOUR FREEDOMS
  22. CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY OFFICER’S SOUL 

Continue reading “Strategic Communication and Public Diplomacy “Quotables” and “Seen on the Web” (#49)

Fact-check: BBG can now broadcast to Americans?

The change to the governance structure of the Broadcasting Board of Governors through an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act has raised some concerns that the BBG might turn inward to target American audiences through domestic broadcasting. An article at Politico, for example, stated that because of the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act of 2013, “the BBG can now broadcast in the U.S., too.” Fox’s Howard Kurtz was more accurate when he wrote that the three-year-old amendment means that the “BBG’s content can also be broadcast in the United States.” The first is not accurate, while Kurtz is slightly misleading. Here’s why.

Continue reading “Fact-check: BBG can now broadcast to Americans?

Strategic Communications and Public Diplomacy “Seen on the Web” (#47)

Quotables, Seen on the Web, and Essays (#47) was compiled by Donald Bishop, Bren Chair of Strategic Communications, Marine Corps University.

1. FAKE NEWS . . . 2. THE U.S. ELECTIONS . . . 3. CONGRESS . . . 4. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY . . . 5. BROADCASTING . . . 6. PUBLIC AFFAIRS . . . 7. MARINE CORPS . . . 8. SMITH-MUNDT ACT . . . 9. HYBRID WARFARE . . . 10. SOCIAL MEDIA . . . 11. INTERNET ACCESS AS A HUMAN RIGHT . . . 12. RUSSIA . . . 13. ISLAMISM . . . 14. CHINA . . . 15. NORTH KOREA . . . 16. AFRICA . . . 17. BOOK FAIRS . . . 18. STUDY IN THE U.S. . . . 19. HISTORY . . . 20. IDEAS, CONCEPTS, DOCTRINE . . . 21. FOREIGN SERVICE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY OFFICERS Continue reading “Strategic Communications and Public Diplomacy “Seen on the Web” (#47)

There’s a new #1 “R”… as in longest tenure

Milestone near Richmond Park, Greater London area, UK
Source: Matt Armstrong, taken in East Sheen near Richmond Park.

Milestones are important. They were to reassure travelers that they were on the right path, how far they had gone, and how far they had to go. Living in London, I find it surprising how many milestones, many of which are hundreds of years old, are hiding in plain sight. They do not, however, tell us how we are doing.  Continue reading “There’s a new #1 “R”… as in longest tenure

Loy Henderson: supporter of public diplomacy, but perhaps not jazz

Loy Henderson
Source: Wikipedia

In the world of U.S. public diplomacy, jazz is often portrayed as an “instrument” of “soft power”, and presumably of “public diplomacy”. The music is democratic by nature. It communicates, as does all music, but it has a particular way of “freeing” the listener to transport and convey messages. It is an art form that inspires. The Public Diplomacy Council recently co-hosted an event on this. 
Continue reading “Loy Henderson: supporter of public diplomacy, but perhaps not jazz

Diplomacy’s Public Dimension: Books, Articles, Websites #79

March 9, 2016
 
Intended for teachers of public diplomacy and related courses, here is an update on resources that may be of general interest.  Suggestions for future updates are welcome.
 
Bruce Gregory
Adjunct Professor
George Washington University
Georgetown University
BGregory@gwu.edu
Bg243@georgetown.edu
  Continue reading “Diplomacy’s Public Dimension: Books, Articles, Websites #79

Lippman on the Media

Walter Lippmann was an astute political philosopher, journalist, and economist. He (rightly) viewed competent journalists as critical to democracy, while ignorant journalists, and ignorance of journalism, was a threat to democracy.

“Men who have lost their grip upon the relevant facts of their environment are the inevitable victims of agitation and propaganda. The quack, the charlatan, the jingo, and the terrorist, can flourish only where the audience is deprived of independent access to information.”

— Walter Lippmann, Liberty and the News, 1920

Continue reading “Lippman on the Media

1949: “You’ve told us why the Voice, but you haven’t told us what it is”

"INP Kept Busy 'Untwisting' News of U.S."

In August 1949, George V. Allen wrote an article for the Washington Star newspaper responding to a frequent question of the time: why were Voice of America programs not conveniently heard inside the United States. Allen was the best person to answer the question as the Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, and thus the “owner” of VOA and the rest of what we today would call “public diplomacy.”

Continue reading “1949: “You’ve told us why the Voice, but you haven’t told us what it is”

VOA in 1967

Source: http://www.ontheshortwaves.com/VOA_Stamp.html

In May 1967, The New York Times reported that the Voice of America was:

  • Broadcasting using 35 transmitters inside the United States;
  • Broadcasting using 57 transmitters outside the United States;
  • Broadcasting in 38 languages, although one-quarter of the total output was in English; and,
  • Rebroadcast by 3,000 radio stations using taped programs, adding 15,000 transmitter hours each week.

Continue reading “VOA in 1967

No, We Do Not Need to Revive the U.S. Information Agency – endnote edition

Cheshire cat queries Alice

You know you’ve heard it. Whether it was at the office, at school, or a social setting (how erudite of you!), you heard someone bemoan the loss of the United States Information Agency. Perhaps that someone was you. In my experience, these laments are really a coded acknowledgment that the U.S. lacks a strategy, an organizing principle, and empowered individuals to operate in an information-driven world. Continue reading “No, We Do Not Need to Revive the U.S. Information Agency – endnote edition