• Now Media,  Wikileaks

    Does New Media Really Matter when Arabs Tweet?

    The actions of the Wikileaks organization will spark a much needed discussion on the roles of so-called “old” media and “new” media in to the modern environment. Just days before the public disclosure of classified material by the website Wikileaks and three major newspaper hand-picked by Wikileaks, Professor Dennis Murphy asked “Does new media really matter?” The cause of the question is itself interesting:an op-ed by Rhami Khouri titled “When Arabs Tweet” in the most classic “old media” outlets there is, The New York Times. The Times is also one of the three papers chosen by Wikileaks to disseminate initial commentary and analysis on the “Afghan War Diary“, as Wikileaks…

  • Now Media,  Public Diplomacy,  Social Media

    Twitter’s impact on public diplomacy

    On July 16, 2010, The Huffington Post published an opinion piece authored by John Brown, former U.S. Foreign Service officer and currently Adjunct Professor of Liberal Studies at Georgetown University. In the op-ed titled "What’s important, what’s happening, and what’s public diplomacy," Brown discusses the limitation of social media as an intellectual or political tool. Instead of heavily focusing on using social media such as Twitter to engage with target audiences, public diplomacy practitioners should execute public diplomacy via person-to-person contact where they can speak freely beyond 140 characters. Brown says, "Much of what twitterers say is as significant as that Viagra ad aired on the corporate evening news. ‘Now’…

  • Now Media,  Public Diplomacy

    In the interest of informed debate on Public Diplomacy

    By Craig Hayden I am curious to hear the following statement, made by one of America’s preeminent critics of public diplomacy thinking, clarified a bit more: All too many academic theories about PD are incomprehensible, pompously-expressed “concepts” from persons — among them rightfully esteemed tenured professors whose intelligence is all too often joined with a tactless inability to handle the last three feet of person-to-person contact — who have never actually worked as diplomats in the field of “public diplomacy,” which they pontificate about, often too assuredly, from their ivory towers on comfortable campuses so distant from what some call the “real world.” The quote appeared in a recent article…

  • Congress,  Government Broadcasting,  Public Diplomacy,  Reports

    Senate Report on the Broadcasting Board of Governors

    The most extensive report on the issues facing the Broadcasting Board of Governors and US international broadcasting was released this week. “US International Broadcasting – Is Anybody Listening? – Keeping the US Connected” (1mb PDF) was prepared by the staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, under the leadership of senior professional staff member Paul Foldi, and is the best, if not the only, substantial review of its kind. The report describes the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) as transforming from its intent of a political “firewall” to a modern political “football” that has resulted in an average vacancy on the board of over 470 days. Even now, the new…

  • ICT,  Now Media,  Psychological Struggle,  Social Media

    Hugo Chávez: taking the battle to the Internet

    By Mariana González Insua Hugo Chávez’ tight grip on Venezuelan media threatens to reach new levels. The Venezuelan leader’s recent announcement that every country needs to regulate the Internet and the launch of his “guerrilla” communicational campaign have sparked fears that his control over the media might be extended to the online world. Chávez’ dominance of traditional forms of media in Venezuela is unquestionable. Not only does the Venezuelan leader have his own weekly show, but he is the brain behind Telesur and Radio del Sur, television and radio channels aimed at exporting the Venezuelan “socialist” model beyond Venezuela’s borders while reinforcing Chávez’ message at home. However, what has caused…

  • Events,  Public Diplomacy

    Tehran acknowledges the power of Twitter and Public Diplomacy?

    An interesting week long seminar advertised by the International Center for Journalists with interesting sponsors [emphasis mine]: Modern communication course to be held in Tehran Posted on: 13/07/2009 Basic Journalism Country: Iran Tehran’s Imam Sadiq University will hold a training course on "modern thinking in theories of communication sciences" from August 1 to 7, media news.ir reported. Registration is being accepted on a rolling basis. The week-long course will feature topics including: Islam and communication sciences, philosophy and communication and political [communication] and public diplomacy. The course is sponsored by the students’ branch of the Basij force, the Mowlana Foundation, and the Centre for Media Studies and Research in Tehran.…

  • ICT,  Now Media

    Noteworthy Links: Information and Communication edition

    New edition of AP Stylebook adds entries and helpful features: AP writers can now use the phrase "to Twitter" in place of the wordier "to post a Twitter update." Both are far better (and technologically adept) than The New York Times use of “on their Twitter page.” If you provide services to poor people, should you make a profit? Interesting question that goes to the increasing connectivity in Africa. (h/t @ICT4D) Feeds for Information Graphics. Compiled by the Art Director for the Associated Press Interactive Design & Graphics Department in New York. IT Dashboard. Track information technology spending by the US Government. For example, see that the State Department is doing…