• China,  Public Diplomacy

    Recommended Reading: China’s New Diplomacy

    In the latest issue of the Netherlands Institute of International Relations Clingendael‘s Discussion Papers in Diplomacy, China is featured in a paper titled “The Shanghai Cooperation Organization and China’s New Diplomacy” by Gao Fei, an expert on contemporary Chinese diplomacy and Russian affairs. According to Clingendael: This article offers a Chinese perspective of the elements and approaches of what is often called China’s ‘New Diplomacy’ and argues that China’s involvement in the development of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) can be regarded as an exemplary case of ‘China’s New Diplomacy.’ The article furthermore aims to contribute to the understanding of China’s emerging role in the international multilateral arena. The concepts…

  • Now Media,  Public Diplomacy,  Social Media

    Twitter’s impact on public diplomacy

    On July 16, 2010, The Huffington Post published an opinion piece authored by John Brown, former U.S. Foreign Service officer and currently Adjunct Professor of Liberal Studies at Georgetown University. In the op-ed titled "What’s important, what’s happening, and what’s public diplomacy," Brown discusses the limitation of social media as an intellectual or political tool. Instead of heavily focusing on using social media such as Twitter to engage with target audiences, public diplomacy practitioners should execute public diplomacy via person-to-person contact where they can speak freely beyond 140 characters. Brown says, "Much of what twitterers say is as significant as that Viagra ad aired on the corporate evening news. ‘Now’…

  • Cultural Diplomacy,  Public Diplomacy

    Refurbished approach to cultural diplomacy by Martin Rose of the British Council

    In a July 2010 issue of Layalina Productions’ Perspectives, British Council officer Martin Rose argues for the West, particularly Europe, to be more “culturally literate” and refurbish its approach to cultural relations. Rose discusses the social and cultural marginalization of immigrant minorities in Europe, who recently have been lumped into the category of “Muslims” to the detriment of their national identities. He argues the need for Europe to be more open-minded and accepting of the “huge multiplicity of rivers that flow into our sea.” Urging non-Muslim Europeans to break the “Us vs. Them” mentality when approaching cultural differences, Rose advocates building trust, understanding and personal relationships to “live well in…

  • China,  Government Broadcasting,  Media,  Public Diplomacy

    China aims to expand soft power, adds English-language news channel

    In 2000, China Central Television (CCTV) launched CCTV International, its 24-hour English-language news service aimed for the global audience. CCTV’s international broadcasting has since expanded to cover news -from a Chinese perspective- in French, Spanish, Russian, and since 2009, Arabic. On July 1, 2010, China launched another international English language news channel to expand its soft power. According to a July 2, 2010 article from The Guardian by Tania Branigan, Chinese authorities hope the launch of state news agency Xinhua‘s CNC World channel will help promote China’s image and perspectives. Similar to CCTV’s international objective, Xinhua’s president said CNC would “present an international vision with a China perspective.” Currently, CNC…

  • Book Reviews,  Public Diplomacy

    Recommended Reading List on Public Diplomacy

    The Netherlands Institute of International Relations Clingendael offers an impressive reading list on public diplomacy. Spanning over 20 pages, the compilation of literature includes articles from a wide range of publications including Foreign Affairs, State Magazine, Hague Journal of Diplomacy, Foreign Policy, journals focused on specific regions of the world, and more. This reading list is part of the institute’s series of compilations of articles dedicated to diplomacy; other topics include Branding; Citizen Diplomacy; City Diplomacy; Cultural Diplomacy; Economic Diplomacy; European level diplomacy and the European diplomatic service; Negotiation, Culture and Intercultural Communication; and Soft power and public diplomacy in (East) Asia.In addition to diplomacy, the think tank, which advises…

  • Defense Department

    Attack or Defend? Leveraging Information and Balancing Risk in Cyberspace

    In his article, “Attack or Defend? Leveraging Information and Balancing Risk in Cyberspace,” Dennis Murphy discusses the Department of Defense’s policy toward the Internet, which enables opportunities to counter misinformation online and tell the story of the U.S. military. He questions, however, if organizational culture will embrace this approach.Murphy, a professor of Information Operations and Information in Warfare at the U.S. Army War College and retired U.S. Army colonel, notes the government must consider the use of the Internet by a potential adversary in future warfighting challenges. Although military leaders openly regard the importance of using new media and Internet tools, recent Defense Department policy directs commanders to continue to…

  • China,  Government Broadcasting,  Media,  Public Diplomacy

    CCTV: China’s soft power in the Middle East

    On May 27, 2010, The National published an article about China’s engagement strategy, carried out by state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV), toward Arab television viewers in the Middle East and North Africa. Many countries broadcast to the Middle East in Arabic, including France, Russia, and the U.S., but China is different: it broadcasts, from Beijing, to the region in Chinese with Arabic subtitles. Instead of focusing on news and current events in the Middle East, CCTV highlights Chinese culture and the arts. Simply, “…CCTV Arabic aims to tell the Arab world about China.“ In his article, Daniel Bardsley further describes China’s strategy, which involves voicing the views of the…

  • Now Media,  Social Media

    The evolving role of now media in Thailand

    For a little over two months, Thailand’s brewing political conflict surfaced the streets of Bangkok, leading “red shirt” and “yellow shirt” protestors to violently battle their political differences. The riots killed nearly 90 and wounded nearly 1,800 people, disrupting the lives of tourists and locals, including Thai Facebook users. On May 24, 2010, The Christian Science Monitor published an article titled “Thailand’s red shirts and yellow shirts battle it out on Facebook“. The author, Simon Montlake, explains how Thai protestors took advantage of Facebook to fuel hate speech, peer pressure, intolerance, and zealous debate. Ironically, Thais are generally known as polite people who try to avoid confrontation. Regardless, the cultural…

  • Psychological Struggle

    South Korea’s psychological warfare on North Korea

    Since May 20, 2010, South Korea has consistently made international headlines by formally accusing North Korea of sinking one of its warships in March, killing 46 South Korean sailors, and announcing major economic decisions to punish the North. Perhaps more interesting is South Korea’s psychological warfare against North Korea.

  • Events,  Government Broadcasting,  Public Diplomacy

    Event: U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Business Meeting

    On May 25, 2010, the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations will hold a business meeting at the Capitol Building in S-116 at 2:15 p.m. Presided by Senator John Kerry, the meeting will go over the following legislation: S 3317: Haiti Empowerment, Assistance and Rebuilding Act of 2010 S 3193: International Cyberspace and Cybersecurity Coordination Act of 2010 S 3104: A bill to permanently authorize Radio Free Asia, and for other purposes S Res 469: A resolution recognizing the 60th Anniversary of the Fulbright Program in Thailand S Res 532: A Resolution recognizing Expo 2010 Shanghai China and the USA Pavilion at the Expo The meeting will also review two…